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Healthy Brains at Work—The Impact of Workplace Mental Health Initiatives

No one, and no workplace, is immune to mental illness. And as research continues to show, poor mental health can negatively impact an individual’s health, well-being, and productivity. Organizations that pay attention to the mental health and wellness of their employees are likely to realize significant benefits through a healthier, more productive workforce. How does your organization fare? Join us for this third briefing in our Healthy Brains at Work research series, as we explore the potential impact of improving outcomes for working Canadians living with mental illness. We also explore the potential impact of improving outcomes for Canadians whose symptoms prevent them from entering the workforce. In this 60-minute session, Conference Board researcher Greg Sutherland will present original research on the potential impact of poor mental health on the Canadian economy.

Recorded Webinar | November 2016 | Greg Sutherland | The Conference Board of Canada

Bending the Cost Curve in Canadian Health Care: The Economics of Health

Canadian provinces typically devote approximately 7.7 per cent of their GDP to health expenditures—a figure that some say could climb to around 10 per cent by 2030. However, we are not doing enough to prepare ourselves for the type of high acuity and cognitively impaired patients who will soon need long-term care, and which require different set of investments, capital stock, and health human resources than we currently deploy. Currently, expenditure growth on public health care appears to be slowing, though it is unclear whether this slowdown is the result of the provinces’ success in sustainably bending the cost curve, or a result of short-term cost-cutting in response to reduced economic growth and federal health transfers. So where can we start? And what can be done to address this issue before it becomes a major crisis? Free Book for all Participants! Each registration includes a complimentary copy of Dr. Marchildon’s book, Bending the Cost Curve in Health Care: Canada’s Provinces in International Perspective.

Recorded Webinar | October 2016 | The Conference Board of Canada

Walkability Pays: The Financial Benefits of Healthy Communities

This webinar will present new and exciting modeling tools developed by Urban Design 4 Health to support healthy communities in land use and transportation decision-making. It will review why health should be addressed in scenario planning; highlight several tools explicitly built to predict how investing in walkable neighbourhoods would support active transportation and resulting decreases in obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular rates; and present current examples of monetized health benefits from plans that support active transportation. The webinar will describe the California Public Health Assessment Module (CPHAM), a spatially resolute tool that can valuate health impacts of changes in physical activity and chronic disease from contrasting land use and transportation investment scenarios. CPHAM’s application in supporting regional transportation planning in Los Angeles and Madison, Wisconsin will be presented. The webinar will highlight a similar tool developed for application in West Don Lands located east of Downtown Toronto and Surrey Centre in Surrey, British Columbia. It will also introduce several new tools for supporting health in policy conversations. The National Built, Natural & Social Environment Database comprising of standardized built, natural, and social environmental indicators will be presented. The use of the database as an input into the National Public Health Assessment Module (NPHAM) will also be discussed. Finally, the webinar will discuss extending health modeling by monetizing predicted health benefits. It will show how health modeling in the Los Angeles case was extended to calculate direct, indirect, and induced health and financial benefits of active transportation. University of British Columbia research linking walkability to BCGenerations Project and provincial health records and costs in Vancouver will also be discussed.

Recorded Webinar | October 2016 | The Conference Board of Canada

Intellectual Property for SMEs: Managing Risks and Optimizing Benefits

The knowledge economy is acutely dependent on various domestic and international legal regimes that transform innovative ideas into “knowledge products”: tradable commodities that can be bought and sold in the global marketplace. Since intellectual property rights (IP) are a mechanism through which innovative ideas are commercialized, IP is quickly becoming the primary currency of this new international economic order. is your organization as familiar with this process as it should be? Canadian businesses, and in particular SMEs, need to become experts at the mechanics of IP and how to strategically leverage IP rights to their competitive advantage. They must be able to seize commercial opportunities as they present themselves and be adept at optimizing the practices and techniques surrounding their IP assets in order to ensure efficiency of production. They also need to be able to understand and manage the risks that IP can pose. So where does your organization fit? Are you as familiar with the ins and outs of IP rights as you should be? Are you missing out on potential opportunities? Are you unprepared for potential risks?

Recorded Webinar | September 2016 | The Conference Board of Canada

Aboriginal Law in Canada: Understanding the Impact of the Extractive Sector Transparency Measures Act

Brought into force in June of 2015, The Extractive Sector Transparency Act aims to increase transparency and deter corruption by requiring that extractive entities publicly disclose, on an annual basis, specific payments made to all governments in Canada and abroad. A guide published in conjunction with the legislation provides examples of the types of payments required to be disclosed, and unsurprisingly, includes most payments made to government. However, the act also requires the declaration of all payments made to Aboriginal Governments, leading many to worry that that the legislation may extend too far. For instance, how should industry and Aboriginal governments treat payments made and received under impact benefit agreements? If these payments are not tied to permitting and authorizations, why should they be captured by this legislation? Is there any other purpose being served to collect data on such payments? As it stands, the potential consequence of reporting payments for Aboriginal Governments are not well understood. Similarly, there is a question of how to reconcile non-disclosure with Aboriginal sovereignty. The government of Canada has extended applicability to Aboriginal peoples until June 2017, but will it be enough? While the intent of this law is to cut down on corruption and increase transparency, what are the possible ramifications?

Recorded Webinar | September 2016 | The Conference Board of Canada

From Knowledge to Innovation: Building Canada's Competitiveness Through Knowledge Management

Many organizations struggle with innovation, but could it be that they’re just missing a few important steps? For many years, Canada has been shown to have difficulty translating investments in research and development, which produces world class knowledge, into globally competitive firms. So what are the missing pieces? How could organizations translate their knowledge into innovation? Why is it important? What role does knowledge management play in modern organizations and how does it relate to technology, collaboration, and driving value from innovation? Join us for this 60 minute session, where Paul Preston will demystify knowledge management and innovation, drawing on recent research findings from our recent studies Driving Knowledge Management for Innovation and How Canada Performs: Report Card on Innovation. Paul will also share findings from the Conference Board's Knowledge Management 2016 Conference, where experts from across the country revealed the critical need to more effectively manage, and extend the value from, the knowledge we have in Canadian organizations.

Recorded Webinar | September 2016 | The Conference Board of Canada

Value of Physician Assistants: Understanding the Role of Physician Assistants Within Health Systems

Delivering high-quality, effective, and sustainable health services is both a top priority and one of the most pressing challenges facing Canada today. But in a system that’s already stretched for resources, extra funding for new initiatives or staff can be a long and daunting process. Is there a middle ground?Physician assistants (PAs) are academically prepared and highly skilled health care professionals who provide a broad range of medical services in different clinical settings. Under the supervision of a physician, PA’s provide needed support and care when other medical staff could be stretched to their limit. However, despite their invaluable role, there is a lack of data on the impact of PAs from a productivity and cost-effectiveness perspective.

Recorded Webinar | September 2016 | Gabriela Prada | The Conference Board of Canada

Understanding Canada’s Aboriginal Business Landscape

Promise and Prosperity 2016, the latest research project from The Canadian Council for Aboriginal Business (CCAB), is the product of over 1,100 interviews with Aboriginal entrepreneurs from across the country. This data-driven report covers sectors, demographics, company size, profitability, success rates, challenges and opportunities faced by private Aboriginal businesses in Canada. The report findings speak to the increasing success and growth of Aboriginal businesses, and highlight the importance of support for both aboriginal communities, and Canada as a whole. But are we doing enough to support these organizations? How can we ensure that this positive momentum is sustained moving forward? Join Max Skudra from the CCAB as he profiles Canadian Aboriginal Businesses, and explores how these businesses could be supported to the benefit of all Canadians. Max will discuss the research, provide examples of best practices, and show how industry and government can support businesses by procuring goods and services from local Aboriginal companies. CCAB research findings on Aboriginal Economic Development Corporations (AEDCs) will also be discussed. AEDCs represent the goals of their communities in the market place, and can act as an important business to business vehicle to help satisfy the Duty to Consult and emerging requirement of ensuring Free Prior and Informed Consent (FPIC) when working with Indigenous communities. Don’t miss this chance to hear how these community-owned corporations work for their members in the market economy.

Recorded Webinar | August 2016 | The Conference Board of Canada

Specialty Medications: Background Information for Employers

This briefing is the first in a research series undertaken by The Conference Board of Canada to provide insight into the impact of specialty medications on private drug plan management.

Briefing | 38 pages | July 2016 | The Conference Board of Canada

Les médicaments spécialisés : renseignements généraux à l’intention des employeurs

Cette note de recherche est la première d’une série de recherches menées par le Conference Board du Canada pour analyser l’impact des médicaments spécialisés sur la gestion privée des régimes d’assurance médicaments.   Cette publication comprend un résumé en français, suivi d'une version anglaise du rapport intégral.

Résumé | 42 pages | July 2016 | Le Conference Board du Canada

Learning from Israel’s IT Innovation Experience

Israel has been heralded as both a model of innovation success as well as a source of innovation policy insights for other countries. In addition to leading nearly all countries in spending on research and development as a share of GDP, Israel’s high-tech firms attract massive amounts of venture capital, benefit from deep integration in global technology value chains, and have fostered rich partnerships with global firms and researchers. Israel’s well-educated and skilled researchers have developed many cutting-edge information technology products and components and the country is a leader in encryption, anti-virus software, and other cyber-security technologies. So how has Israel become a leader in research and innovation? How much of Israel’s success is due to policy and institutional choices, and how much to cultural and historical circumstances? What outstanding challenges to innovation performance does Israel face and how are these being addressed? What can Canada learn from Israel’s experience? Join Daniel Munro as he draws on recent data, literature and discussions with Israeli decision-makers and experts to answer these questions and more. Learn how innovation performance in Canada and Israel compare on key indicators, what factors explain some of the differences, and what lessons Canada should (and should not) draw from Israel’s experience.

Recorded Webinar | July 2016 | Daniel Munro | The Conference Board of Canada

Dollars and Sense: Using Health Economics to Inform Public Policy: Part 2

Economic analyses are an essential tool for policy makers who make difficult decisions regarding the allocation of scarce public health resources. However, traditional cost-effectiveness analyses are not always the most appropriate or useful approach for value assessment, particularly when the benefits of said investment are accrued over-time. So where’s the middle ground? The Conference Board of Canada has taken a different approach to this analysis. Our research predominately focuses on a cost-consequence approach to estimating the burden of illnesses and the health and economic impact of health programs and policies, where direct costs are associated with health care system utilization, and indirect costs are associated with productivity and benefits to the economy. In this two-part webinar series (July 12 and July 14), Dr. Thy Dinh will provide an overview of the key concepts in health economics and demonstrate how health economics can be used to answer difficult health policy questions, now and in the future. Thy will describe several approaches to estimating burden of illness, the health and economic impact of a new or proposed policy, and the benefits of "scaling-up" existing or pilot interventions to different or larger populations. Don’t miss this chance to hear information on resources that could be used by researchers, policy analysts, and public health practitioners who may not have the capacity or need to conduct full health economic evaluations.

Recorded Webinar | July 2016 | Thy Dinh | The Conference Board of Canada

Dollars and Sense: Using Health Economics to Inform Public Policy

Economic analyses are an essential tool for policy makers who make difficult decisions regarding the allocation of scarce public health resources. However, traditional cost-effectiveness analyses are not always the most appropriate or useful approach for value assessment, particularly when the benefits of said investment are accrued over-time. So where’s the middle ground? The Conference Board of Canada has taken a different approach to this analysis. Our research predominately focuses on a cost-consequence approach to estimating the burden of illnesses and the health and economic impact of health programs and policies, where direct costs are associated with health care system utilization, and indirect costs are associated with productivity and benefits to the economy. In this two-part 90 minute webinar series (July 12 and July 14), Dr. Thy Dinh will provide an overview of the key concepts in health economics and demonstrate how health economics can be used to answer difficult health policy questions, now and in the future. Thy will describe several approaches to estimating burden of illness, the health and economic impact of a new or proposed policy, and the benefits of "scaling-up" existing or pilot interventions to different or larger populations. Don’t miss this chance to hear information on resources that could be used by researchers, policy analysts, and public health practitioners who may not have the capacity or need to conduct full health economic evaluations.

Recorded Webinar | July 2016 | Thy Dinh | The Conference Board of Canada

How Businesses Can Impact Reconciliation: The Benefits of A New Partnership Path

In 2015, the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada came out with 94 Calls to Action targeted at addressing the many impacts of the residential school system on Indigenous people in Canada. In moving forward, reconciliation has two broad agenda: an equity agenda aimed at closing the gap in a variety of factors including education, income and health; and a restoration agenda aimed at building a new relationship between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal people in Canada. Businesses can play a role in both of these agendas. This special webinar is with David Newhouse, an expert in Indigenous governance and thought, and modern Aboriginal societies. David is a Professor of Indigenous Studies at Trent University in Peterborough, Ontario.

Recorded Webinar | June 2016 | The Conference Board of Canada

Canadian Health Care in 2035: Four Scenarios on the Future of Health Care Funding

How could strategic foresight help our health care system? Unlike traditional economic forecasting that focuses on the development of a probable or most-likely future, strategic foresight aims instead to develop a series of plausible futures. Its goal is not to predict the future—rather to offer insights to decision-makers on how best to prepare for all possibilities, what they might do to shift toward a future they prefer, and how to recognize and adapt to events and trends that may point toward a specific future. The Conference Board of Canada applies strategic foresight techniques to a range of issues, from the future of energy in Canada to a range of security and intelligence challenges. Health care sustainability is, and will remain a key issue for Canadians in the years ahead. In this special webinar, Dr. Satyamoorthy Kabilan will explore health care funding scenarios generated by representatives of the Canadian Alliance for Sustainable Health Care (CASHC) and other health system stakeholders (see Funding Canadian Health Care in 2035: Strategic Foresight Scenarios). Kabi will explore four possible scenarios for health care funding in 2035, highlighting the key drivers shaping these divergent scenarios and the elements that each scenario has in common. While there is no certainty that we are moving toward any specific scenario, these scenarios provide insights into strategic elements that must be taken into account by all stakeholders, regardless of how our country, and the world, evolves. The scenarios suggest priorities that Canadians should consider if they wish to tilt the odds in a particular direction, and give decision-makers insights into how Canadian health care strategies might be shaped within the context of each of these futures.

Recorded Webinar | June 2016 | Satyamoorthy Kabilan | The Conference Board of Canada

The Path to Better: Improving Quality in our Health Care Systems

Quality improvement in health care is one of the greatest opportunities of our generation. It plays a critical role in helping Canada's health care system deal with two daunting problems: large variations in quality of care and the lack of appropriate measures to ensure that many patients (especially high risk ones) receive the care and support they need, when they need it. Key dimensions of the quality agenda include the triple aim of health care and the six dimensions for improvement identified by the Institute of Medicine. But are current plans on the right track? What can health stakeholders do now to help create a better healthcare system moving forward? In this webinar, Dr. Joshua Tepper will outline five key steps health system stakeholders must take to ensure that best practices are implemented and become the normative standard of care for everyone. These steps include teaching people the skills they need, adopting electronic health records and information technology systems, looking at systems rather than sectors, discussing and learning from failure, and selecting quality leaders. These steps will drive the quality agenda and will help us collectively ensure the quality health system Canadians deserve.

Recorded Webinar | June 2016 | The Conference Board of Canada

Workplace Inclusion for Indigenous People

Workplace inclusion can be a complex topic for any organization. Bringing together employees from multicultural backgrounds has many challenges and many benefits. The Aboriginal Human Resource Council has been working with companies and Indigenous organizations for sixteen years. The Council has learned first-hand from Indigenous employees what inclusive organizations look like, why it’s important and why it leads to better retention. Build your understanding of your Indigenous employees’ views and perspectives about your workplace and why inclusion is so important to their success.

Recorded Webinar | May 2016 | The Conference Board of Canada

Changing Healthcare for the Better: Lessons from Ontario’s Chief Health Innovation Strategist

Healthcare innovation doesn’t just happen. So who is responsible for making sure it does? In 2013, the government of Ontario established the Ontario Health Innovation Council (OHIC), a group of experts from the health care, research, academic, business and not-for-profit sectors. Their mandate: to provide recommendations on how Ontario could accelerate the adoption of new technologies in the health care system and support the growth and competitiveness of Ontario’s health technology sector. In December 2014, the government accepted all of the council’s recommendations, which included the establishment of a brand new office for Ontario’s health regulators. The Office of the Chief Health Innovation Strategist (OCHIS) is a catalyst to help accelerate health technology commercialization efforts in Ontario. OCHIS works on behalf of health technology innovators to remove barriers and improve access to Ontario’s health care system. Our goal is to grow businesses and build a health innovation ecosystem in Ontario. Purpose To drive collaboration across the health care system to accelerate the adoption and diffusion of new innovative health technologies and processes to: Improve patient outcomes (in accordance with the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care’s Patients First: Action Plan for Health Care) Add value to the system Create jobs in Ontario. So how does the OCHIS accomplish this monumental task? Who is accountable? And what results can we expect to see in the future?

Recorded Webinar | May 2016 | The Conference Board of Canada

Multiple Sclerosis in the Workplace: Achieving Successful Employment Experiences

Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a significant health and economic issue in Canada. Decreased workforce participation from people living with MS is often detrimental to the health and financial situation of people living with the disease and their loved ones. In addition, lost productivity associated with the disease may cost Canada hundreds of millions of dollars per year. The facts are clear: Canada has the highest prevalence of MS in the world Most MS diagnoses occur in people during their prime working years (15-40 yrs old) By not effectively employing and retaining people living with MS, employers are often losing workers with valuable experience and training A positive employer attitude to MS and employee accommodations can benefit employers and employees Early use of interventions and disease management strategies is essential to maximise their effectiveness In order to explore this issue and strategies that can be used to achieve the most successful employment experiences, the Conference Board of Canada undertook a two phase research project on this topic including a broad literature review followed up with a facilitated stakeholder workshop including representatives from provincial and federal government, not-for-profit organizations, employers, insurers, researchers, individuals living with MS and caregivers. Join Dr. Philip Astles as he discusses the findings of this research, and explores the insights gained.

Recorded Webinar | May 2016 | Philip Astles | The Conference Board of Canada

Transforming Healthcare Technology for an Aging Population: Quality Living in the Golden Years

AGE-WELL is Canada’s first research network in technology and aging. This initiative aims to help older Canadians maintain their health and quality of life through practical and affordable technologies that increase safety and security, support independent living, and enhance participation in social activities. However, while there has been significant research on the development of these technologies, the majority of these devices have not made it to market, or suffer from various limitations that make them inappropriate for an older adult to operate efficiently and effectively. In order to ensure that future technologies for aging populations are useful, a rethink of design and use is required. So what’s the next step?

Recorded Webinar | May 2016 | The Conference Board of Canada

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